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Review | Awful Auntie | Manchester Opera House

Review | Awful Auntie | Manchester Opera House

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Growing up in a world of Harry Potter, Roald Dahl and Malory Towers, I love the adventures that characters can get up to in a big haunted house, so was very excited to see how the award-winning author and comedian David Walliams’ Awful Auntie was transformed into a stage production by Birmingham Stage Company.

After recent success with the tour of Gangsta Granny, Neal Foster’s adaption of Awful Auntie brings fun, panto-esk elements of comedy and spookiness.

Set in 1933 after Lord and Lady Saxby are murdered, young Stella Saxby must solve the mystery of her parent’s death, all without getting caught by her awful auntie Alberta. With the help of a friendly chimney sweep ghost, Soot, Stella is on a mission to stop Alberta becoming the owner of Saxby Hall.

The excellent music orchestrated music by Jak Poore sets the scenes for the murder mystery tale.

Timothy Speyer’s performance of Aunt Alberta reminded me of the horrible Miss Trunchball from Matilda, but a true entertaining perofmrnace. Loud, garish and a haunting laugh will make you hate this character quicker than you can say, Saxby Hall.

Georgina Leonidas and Ashley Cousins make the perfect team of Stella and Soot, and both actors bounce off each other to create some hilarious moments on stage.

The highlight of the show has the be the brief moments that the mad butler Gibbon passes onto the stage. Richard James’ makes the audience roar with laughter with his short moments between scenes where he’s seen mowing the carpet, catching himself in a giant net and burning the slippers for breakfast.

Aunt Albert’s owl Wagner is a puppet, moved by the talented Roberta Bellekom. The use of puppets is intelligent and entertaining, as they create scenes that might not be possible to attempt on stage, such as Wagner flying over the stage while holding onto a little puppet of Stella.

The mixture of storytelling elements makes this show entertaining for all the family, and I suggest seeing this production before it closes.

Awful Auntie is on at Manchester’s Opera House until Sunday 24th June and tickets are available here.

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